Air Pollution Causes, Effects & Solutions

Air Pollution Talk


The indoor air is much more polluted than you think 0

Posted on April 10, 2011 by admin

Most of us leave window well shut and insulated throughout the winter. If you live in a cold climate, you probably have all your windows closed tight from early October until Easter. Now it’s a good time to let them open. If you’re doing spring cleaning and dusting, be sure to turn off the heat and let air in. The indoor air is much more polluted than you think. That’s why we often suffer from allergies and not knowing why. If someone in your household smokes, it’d make it even worse.

Select a good weather weekend, and open all the windows. Mop the floors and vacuum the carpets. If you have area rugs, vacuum them as often as possible. Some area rugs and runners need to professionally cleaned. If they’re beyond cleaning, throw them out.

What is indoor air pollution? 0

Posted on January 01, 2011 by admin

Did you know that most people spend about 90 percent of their time indoors. Whether you’re at work, at home, shopping, or eating. Therefore, indoor air pollution is as great a concern as outdoor air pollution. Indoor air pollution is cause by many factors.

Some of the sources include: gases from oil, gas, or even wood for heating and cooking; cigarette smoking; building materials, such as asbestos insulation and products made from pressed wood; outdoor pollution that come indoors such as radon; cleaning supplies’ chemicals; hair spray and nail polish remover; molds and mildew and pet dander. Any time that your home lacks air circulation, pollutants increase inside your home.

Source: Office on Women’s Health in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health

What can I do to reduce outdoor air pollution 0

Posted on December 11, 2010 by admin

It is true that if each of us does something, it’ll make a difference in reducing outdoor air pollution. But what are the tangible and concrete things we can do? We all know that motor vehicles and power plants that burn fossil fuels are major sources of air pollution. They also release greenhouse gases that lead to climate change. However, there are things we can do every hour to use less energy and reduce air pollution and greenhouse gases. Besides, many of these steps can also save you money. First of all, replace all your lights bulbs at home to energy saving bulbs.

Number 2 is to turn off lights, computers, TVs, and appliances when they’re not in use. Number 3, get the whole family to reuse and recycle to conserve raw materials and energy. Number 6, next time when you need to replace your appliances, buy ENERGY STAR appliances. Or buy them now if you can afford to replacing them. Number 7, buy a vehicle with good fuel economy and low emissions.

Last, but not least, drive less. Walk, walk, and walk. Get the whole family to walk if you can. Carpool, walk, bike, or use public transportation if you can. Combine errands together.

Source: Office on Women’s Health in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health

Controlling the relative humidity at home can minimize growth of biologicals 0

Posted on November 30, 2010 by admin

By controlling the relative humidity level in a home, the growth of some sources of biologicals can be minimized. A relative humidity of 30-50 percent is generally recommended for homes.

Run a dehumidifier in the humid summer months, particularly your basement can help eliminating some potential sources. Set your dehumidifier between 30-50, and be sure to place one in the basement. Another important factor to help indoor air quality is to open windows once in awhile to let fresh air in.

Standing water, water-damaged materials, or wet surfaces also serve as a breeding ground for molds, mildews, bacteria, and insects. House dust mites, the source of one of the most powerful biological allergens, grow in damp, warm environments.

Source: EPA

Particle pollution can also have health effects on humans 0

Posted on October 01, 2010 by admin

Other than ground-level ozone, particle pollution is another health threat on the air quality. Particle pollution are tiny solid particles and liquid droplets in the air. This is also called particle matter or PM. You won’t be able to see them. These particles come from dust, fires, motor vehicles, power plants, and factories. Most types of particle pollution are too small to be seen with the naked eye. Particle pollution causes haze. That’s why people tend to see more haze in heavy polluted areas and large cities.

Like the way you would to avoid exposure to other air pollution, you should stay indoors to protect yourself from particle pollution. When the air is hazy, avoid going out or staying outdoors for long period of time if you have asthma or other related problems. Avoid bringing young children out. Stay indoors and plan fun activities at home. The advantage of living in smaller cities and rural areas is that you can enjoy outdoors more often. But the irony is that big cities dwellers tend to go out much more often than rural residents.

Source: Office on Women’s Health in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health

What happens if I’m exposed to ground-level ozone? 0

Posted on September 17, 2010 by admin

Ground-level ozone can harm the environment, crops, and human health. If you already have asthma and bronchitis, exposure to ground-level ozone can make symptoms a lot worse. Because high levels of ground-level ozone can make it difficult to breath deeply, even normal healthy people can experience coughing and throat irritation. In some cases, it and even damage the lining of your lungs.

People with chronic lung conditions such as asthma, emphysema, and bronchitis may be more sensitive to the effects of ozone. Ozone can also have a greater impact on the health of children and adults who are physically active outdoors when ozone levels are high. So limit your activities outdoors during those periods, especially for asthma patients, young children and pregnant women.

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

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Everyone can be exposed to ground-level ozone 0

Posted on August 17, 2010 by admin

Ozone is a gas that is naturally found in earth’s upper atmosphere, where it forms the ozone layer. The ozone layer blocks some of the sun’s harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays.

While Ozone layer protects us from getting all the UV rays, ground-level ozone is a pollutant that can harm the environment, crops, and human health. It is ozone in the lower atmosphere, close to the Earth’s surface. This is one of the main components of smog. Ground-level ozone is formed when sunlight and heat cause chemical reactions between nitrogen oxides and volatile organic compounds .

Volatile organic compounds are pollutants released by motor vehicles, factories and power plants, and chemicals such as paints and cleaners. Since we live in a modern world and we are exposed to all these wherever we go.

Source: Department of Health and Human Services.

What are the symptoms and health effects of outdoor air pollution? 0

Posted on August 11, 2010 by admin

If you wonder what kind of health effects of outdoor air pollution can have on your health, first of all, it can cause your eyes and nose to burn, your throat to itch, and even breathing problems.

In extreme cases, exposure to air pollutants at high levels over a long period of time may lead to cancer, birth defects, brain and nerve damage. It can cause long-term injury to the lungs and breathing passages.

Air pollution doesn’t just affect women, children, and elderly, it affects everyone. Children are especially susceptible to the effects of air pollution because their lungs are developing. Outdoor air pollution also adds more harms to people who have lung and heart diseases because they are more sensitive.

In the U.S., ground-level ozone and particle pollution are two of the most common pollutants and threat to people’s health.

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

How do we get exposed to outdoor air pollution? 0

Posted on August 06, 2010 by admin

If you ever wonder whether the outdoor pollution come from, there are many sources and you can be exposed to them without noticing. It is very difficult to void them living in today’s society. These outdoor air pollutions sources include emissions from cars and trucks, power plants that burn fossil fuels, and factories and forest fires, to name a few. Unless you lock yourself up in the house 24/7, it’s inevitable that you can expose yourself to outdoor pollutions.

The best way to void these pollutants is to limit your outdoor physical activities. If you live in a heavily polluted area, try not to run, jog, or walk with small children outdoors. Because physical activity in polluted areas can cause you and your children to inhale more pollutants into your lungs, particularly if you have asthma. Check the weather station often, don’t go out if it’s windy.

What is ground-level ozone and how can I be exposed to it? 0

Posted on April 13, 2010 by admin

Ozone is a gas that is naturally found in earth’s upper atmosphere, where it forms the ozone layer. The ozone layer blocks some of the sun’s harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays.

Ground-level ozone is ozone in the lower atmosphere, close to the Earth’s surface. This is one of the main components of smog. Ground-level ozone is formed when sunlight and heat cause chemical reactions between nitrogen oxides and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs are pollutants released by motor vehicles, factories and power plants, and chemicals such as paints and cleaners. Ground-level ozone is a pollutant that can harm the environment, crops, and human health.

Source: Office on Women’s Health in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.



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